Miss Foxy Gets Professional.

Reviews. Views. Foxy news.


PAUL SMITH TALKS ALL THINGS MAXIMO WITH MISS FOXY 
I was lucky enough to interview the legendary lead singer, Paul Smith from Maximo Park at their exclusive gig at The Cluny in Newcastle for Jack Daniels Roots competition winners last Thursday. It was an awesome live show with some classic tunes being played, and an energetic crowd who waited on tenterhooks to hear the band play, reminiscing over nostalgic memories of Maximo. Hear what Paul had to say!
Miss Foxy: So great show tonight Paul! This will be the first time I’ve seen you play live and I have to say you were amazing! Do you feel when you play a home show in Newcastle  you always get a good response from the crowd? 
Paul Smith: Yeah definitely. I mean you kind of expect that, and if it doesn’t happen you’d be really gutted! But I’m thankful to say it rarely happens. But you know, you shouldn’t take anything for granted. A lot of people think they can just roll up and the crowd would automatically love it. Which they probably would but I don’t believe in that sort of thing. We just want to focus on getting the music straight off the blocks, and into the crowd. 
Miss Foxy: Well you definitely received an encore at the end of your set! 
Paul Smith: Yeah, they made a right racket! That’s the kind of thing that’s great to see. You know it’s a Thursday night, people might have work in the morning, they might have had a bad day, all sorts of things so if they clap at the end that’s all that matters really. There is a multitude of emotions within the whole of the night and sometimes people don’t clap as loud as you want them to, but you can’t take any of that to heart until the end. The proof is in the pudding! 
Miss Foxy: Definitely! So your last album, National Health I understand you focused upon the global recession and the public taking back control of their own lives. Do you still feel this message is still relevant in each gig you play currently? 
Paul Smith: Yeah, well we were going to play a couple of new songs because we’ve recored 5 or 6 new songs at the moment. We’re on a bit of a roll in terms of writing new material, it’s a very creative time. When we were thinking about playing them I just thought, well, this is being filmed for Channel 4 and other major TV stations, and our previous songs  are still very relevant. It’s only last year the album came out, so for me it’s still important to emphasize the point that this band aren’t just a band that are going through the motions on their 4th record. Our album is still relevant to people’s lives.
Miss Foxy: You just spoke about your new material, when are you hoping to release your new album and are there any musical influences that had an impact on your upcoming release?
Paul Smith: I think early next year we are hoping to release the material, that would be the ideal scenario, since we left it quite long before making the fourth record. I would say this one’s influenced by dance culture, in a very abstract way. And by books as well. So your getting a bit of a schooling, not that anybody cares! I’m not going to be specific! I mean we wrote a few songs and they all seemed to have literary references in them which lead the way to writing more to do with other books. There’s quite a few. I’ve been reading American novelists Don Delillo and John Updike, so basically stuff I was supposed to read on my Masters that I only got half way through! I did a Masters in American Societies and Specific Cultures, and studied Post War American Literature. I didn’t get through all the books, since I was a little distracted by being young and in Newcastle, where I was excited about going out! 
Miss Foxy: Am I right in saying you were an art teacher before you joined Maximo Park?
Paul Smith: Yeah I taught for 18th months after my masters. For three months, after I finished in October I got a full time job in a call centre. It was horrible! After this I took a job as a part time art teacher, so I would write songs in the mornings and the band would shuffle our demos around, and then I would teach art in the evenings. 
Miss Foxy: I’ve done a BA History of Art degree at Goldsmiths, so know a little concerning the main artistic movements! Are there any stylistic influences that you feel have impacted your work?
Paul Smith: Our first album was heavily influenced by Futurism. And in a very sort of distant way, the artwork was based on Blast, The Wyndham Lewis Pamphlet. It had a magenta cover, which was the brightest thing they could do, it was really cheap, and it was one of the basic colors at the printers. I believe it was created in 1929. And it’s opening is futurist poetry , and different little stories. The way that it’s laid out, we pastiched that inside our album cover with the lyrics of our songs being laid out in the same, blocky pattern that was used inside this pamphlet.  The pamphlet aims to destroy what came before, especially after the First World War, and tries to look to something new afterwards. The opening line of The National Health is, “England is ill, and it is not alone.” 
Miss Foxy: So are you disowning your previous album? 
Paul Smith: Not really, I mean I’m quite a sad person. I love pretty much everything that we’ve done on our albums. I like all of our records! So I don’t want to disown them. I mean today we were talking about this whole event, and they asked us for any old videos of when we first started. But to me it’s of it’s time, it’s gone. I don’t really want to deal with it anymore. I don’t really want to look at it! Even though at the time I loved what we were doing. If you played it to me I’d love the music but visual things I hate! I really hate photographs of myself. It makes being out in that room pretty embarrassing really! I mean on the last album we definitely wanted to emphasis that there are artistic meanings, that you wouldn’t necessarily see on the surface of things. We just want to hammer it home that we are quite a unique band in our own way, with very traditional elements like I sing, there’s piano, there’s synthesizers, there’s bass guitar. It’s not reinventing the wheel, but at the same time I feel like trying to provide a new slant on very traditional everyday things. Trying to do something that feels new and fresh. That celebrates the everyday! 
Miss Foxy: Absolutely! So I understand with your previous album ‘Quicken the Heart’ you worked with producer Nick Launay who has worked with Nick Cave and Grinderman, and for 4th album The National Health you worked with Gil Norton who worked previously with such big names as The Pixies. For your upcoming release, are there any major producers in the pipeline? 
Paul Smith: We recorded 5 songs with our friends Field Music. We went to their studio in Sunderland and recorded 5 songs and I think the other 5 songs we are going to try and record ourselves, because the other 5 were recorded in a very basic fashion. The Field Music studio is just them in a warehouse, and they’ve made it sound good because they know what their doing. We’re going to try and do the same thing, because Duncan in the band knows what he’s doing, and we’ve picked up things as we’ve gone along. And it’s cheaper as well! 
Miss Foxy: Definitely! I have to say my favorite track by yourselves is Hips and Lips off The National Health. May I ask what’s the story and inspiration behind the song? 
Paul Smith: It’s kind of an argument really. An argument between two people who are romantically involved. And you know it doesn’t mean that there’s a bad ending, since a lot of people automatically think ‘oh woe is me’ when it comes to romantic problems. But every relationship has its ups and downs. It’s about that moment where you want to know what is going on in inside the other person’s head, where you are unable to fathom what is going on with them! Where they are making a point you just don’t agree with! And I suppose the imagery is quite feminine with the way you ‘stick out your lips’ and ‘put your hands on your hips’. We’ve got this pose, this stance, this visual image of this point of fracture in a relationship. And the line ‘punching the fence’ and ‘sometimes I kick things’ is quite aggressive but I’d rather take it out on an inanimate object frankly then a person to get it out of your system. The actions of kicking a fence sounds pathetic but in the song your frustrated that someone doesn’t understand what your saying and vice versa. I think it’s important to write about everyday things, but try and find your own slant on it. 
Miss Foxy: What have you got planned for this year in terms of gigs and festivals? 
Paul Smith: Well, I’m playing a concert with the people from Field Music. Which will be 40 minutes of new music. It’s strings, and a small tune percussion, double bass. It will be a different set up from the bands that we’re in. And more influenced by Mark Hollis out of Talk Talk, he did a really beautiful, minimal solo album, it’s based around travel writing, which again is quite different from the more emotional stuff I do with the band. And Duncan from Maximo has been doing some stuff by himself. But mostly for Maximo it will be festivals, the recording of our new album, and then we will see what the rest of the year brings. We may look to go abroad and so some gigs before we prepare for the release of our new album. So hopefully it will all be in the bag and we can release it early next year!  
Miss Foxy: That sounds fantastic! I have one more little question for you. What was the last song you listened to today? The last album you bought? And the last live show you went to?
Paul Smith: The last song I listened to was probably a cover of Bruno Mars’s Young Girls by Mark Kozelek. His version is a lot better than the original! He’s changed the melody. I recommend this to all of your listeners. He’s one of my favorite singers. I listened to this song before bed the other night. Another song I listened to early this week was something by Wolf People, a really good, fairly new band to check out. The last album I bought was last week, where I bought an AfroBeat Record from the 70’s, it’s been re-issued. And a Phosphorescent album from a while back. And then an album by artist Jenny Hval, who is on Rune Grammofon Label for Norwegian artists. The final album was by The Shoots, a band from the late 70’s. They did an album of their demos, packed full of powerpop. The last live show I went to was a band called Low, at The Sage in Gateshead. It was beautiful! 
Miss Foxy: Amazing! Well thank you so much for talking the time to talk to me, and again well done on your spectacular show this evening. And I wish you all the best for this year! 

PAUL SMITH TALKS ALL THINGS MAXIMO WITH MISS FOXY 

I was lucky enough to interview the legendary lead singer, Paul Smith from Maximo Park at their exclusive gig at The Cluny in Newcastle for Jack Daniels Roots competition winners last Thursday. It was an awesome live show with some classic tunes being played, and an energetic crowd who waited on tenterhooks to hear the band play, reminiscing over nostalgic memories of Maximo. Hear what Paul had to say!

Miss Foxy: So great show tonight Paul! This will be the first time I’ve seen you play live and I have to say you were amazing! Do you feel when you play a home show in Newcastle  you always get a good response from the crowd? 

Paul Smith: Yeah definitely. I mean you kind of expect that, and if it doesn’t happen you’d be really gutted! But I’m thankful to say it rarely happens. But you know, you shouldn’t take anything for granted. A lot of people think they can just roll up and the crowd would automatically love it. Which they probably would but I don’t believe in that sort of thing. We just want to focus on getting the music straight off the blocks, and into the crowd. 

Miss Foxy: Well you definitely received an encore at the end of your set! 

Paul Smith: Yeah, they made a right racket! That’s the kind of thing that’s great to see. You know it’s a Thursday night, people might have work in the morning, they might have had a bad day, all sorts of things so if they clap at the end that’s all that matters really. There is a multitude of emotions within the whole of the night and sometimes people don’t clap as loud as you want them to, but you can’t take any of that to heart until the end. The proof is in the pudding! 

Miss Foxy: Definitely! So your last album, National Health I understand you focused upon the global recession and the public taking back control of their own lives. Do you still feel this message is still relevant in each gig you play currently? 

Paul Smith: Yeah, well we were going to play a couple of new songs because we’ve recored 5 or 6 new songs at the moment. We’re on a bit of a roll in terms of writing new material, it’s a very creative time. When we were thinking about playing them I just thought, well, this is being filmed for Channel 4 and other major TV stations, and our previous songs  are still very relevant. It’s only last year the album came out, so for me it’s still important to emphasize the point that this band aren’t just a band that are going through the motions on their 4th record. Our album is still relevant to people’s lives.

Miss Foxy: You just spoke about your new material, when are you hoping to release your new album and are there any musical influences that had an impact on your upcoming release?

Paul Smith: I think early next year we are hoping to release the material, that would be the ideal scenario, since we left it quite long before making the fourth record. I would say this one’s influenced by dance culture, in a very abstract way. And by books as well. So your getting a bit of a schooling, not that anybody cares! I’m not going to be specific! I mean we wrote a few songs and they all seemed to have literary references in them which lead the way to writing more to do with other books. There’s quite a few. I’ve been reading American novelists Don Delillo and John Updike, so basically stuff I was supposed to read on my Masters that I only got half way through! I did a Masters in American Societies and Specific Cultures, and studied Post War American Literature. I didn’t get through all the books, since I was a little distracted by being young and in Newcastle, where I was excited about going out! 

Miss Foxy: Am I right in saying you were an art teacher before you joined Maximo Park?

Paul Smith: Yeah I taught for 18th months after my masters. For three months, after I finished in October I got a full time job in a call centre. It was horrible! After this I took a job as a part time art teacher, so I would write songs in the mornings and the band would shuffle our demos around, and then I would teach art in the evenings. 

Miss Foxy: I’ve done a BA History of Art degree at Goldsmiths, so know a little concerning the main artistic movements! Are there any stylistic influences that you feel have impacted your work?

Paul Smith: Our first album was heavily influenced by Futurism. And in a very sort of distant way, the artwork was based on Blast, The Wyndham Lewis Pamphlet. It had a magenta cover, which was the brightest thing they could do, it was really cheap, and it was one of the basic colors at the printers. I believe it was created in 1929. And it’s opening is futurist poetry , and different little stories. The way that it’s laid out, we pastiched that inside our album cover with the lyrics of our songs being laid out in the same, blocky pattern that was used inside this pamphlet.  The pamphlet aims to destroy what came before, especially after the First World War, and tries to look to something new afterwards. The opening line of The National Health is, “England is ill, and it is not alone.” 

Miss Foxy: So are you disowning your previous album? 

Paul Smith: Not really, I mean I’m quite a sad person. I love pretty much everything that we’ve done on our albums. I like all of our records! So I don’t want to disown them. I mean today we were talking about this whole event, and they asked us for any old videos of when we first started. But to me it’s of it’s time, it’s gone. I don’t really want to deal with it anymore. I don’t really want to look at it! Even though at the time I loved what we were doing. If you played it to me I’d love the music but visual things I hate! I really hate photographs of myself. It makes being out in that room pretty embarrassing really! I mean on the last album we definitely wanted to emphasis that there are artistic meanings, that you wouldn’t necessarily see on the surface of things. We just want to hammer it home that we are quite a unique band in our own way, with very traditional elements like I sing, there’s piano, there’s synthesizers, there’s bass guitar. It’s not reinventing the wheel, but at the same time I feel like trying to provide a new slant on very traditional everyday things. Trying to do something that feels new and fresh. That celebrates the everyday! 

Miss Foxy: Absolutely! So I understand with your previous album ‘Quicken the Heart’ you worked with producer Nick Launay who has worked with Nick Cave and Grinderman, and for 4th album The National Health you worked with Gil Norton who worked previously with such big names as The Pixies. For your upcoming release, are there any major producers in the pipeline? 

Paul Smith: We recorded 5 songs with our friends Field Music. We went to their studio in Sunderland and recorded 5 songs and I think the other 5 songs we are going to try and record ourselves, because the other 5 were recorded in a very basic fashion. The Field Music studio is just them in a warehouse, and they’ve made it sound good because they know what their doing. We’re going to try and do the same thing, because Duncan in the band knows what he’s doing, and we’ve picked up things as we’ve gone along. And it’s cheaper as well! 

Miss Foxy: Definitely! I have to say my favorite track by yourselves is Hips and Lips off The National Health. May I ask what’s the story and inspiration behind the song? 

Paul Smith: It’s kind of an argument really. An argument between two people who are romantically involved. And you know it doesn’t mean that there’s a bad ending, since a lot of people automatically think ‘oh woe is me’ when it comes to romantic problems. But every relationship has its ups and downs. It’s about that moment where you want to know what is going on in inside the other person’s head, where you are unable to fathom what is going on with them! Where they are making a point you just don’t agree with! And I suppose the imagery is quite feminine with the way you ‘stick out your lips’ and ‘put your hands on your hips’. We’ve got this pose, this stance, this visual image of this point of fracture in a relationship. And the line ‘punching the fence’ and ‘sometimes I kick things’ is quite aggressive but I’d rather take it out on an inanimate object frankly then a person to get it out of your system. The actions of kicking a fence sounds pathetic but in the song your frustrated that someone doesn’t understand what your saying and vice versa. I think it’s important to write about everyday things, but try and find your own slant on it. 

Miss Foxy: What have you got planned for this year in terms of gigs and festivals? 

Paul Smith: Well, I’m playing a concert with the people from Field Music. Which will be 40 minutes of new music. It’s strings, and a small tune percussion, double bass. It will be a different set up from the bands that we’re in. And more influenced by Mark Hollis out of Talk Talk, he did a really beautiful, minimal solo album, it’s based around travel writing, which again is quite different from the more emotional stuff I do with the band. And Duncan from Maximo has been doing some stuff by himself. But mostly for Maximo it will be festivals, the recording of our new album, and then we will see what the rest of the year brings. We may look to go abroad and so some gigs before we prepare for the release of our new album. So hopefully it will all be in the bag and we can release it early next year!  

Miss Foxy: That sounds fantastic! I have one more little question for you. What was the last song you listened to today? The last album you bought? And the last live show you went to?

Paul Smith: The last song I listened to was probably a cover of Bruno Mars’s Young Girls by Mark Kozelek. His version is a lot better than the original! He’s changed the melody. I recommend this to all of your listeners. He’s one of my favorite singers. I listened to this song before bed the other night. Another song I listened to early this week was something by Wolf People, a really good, fairly new band to check out. The last album I bought was last week, where I bought an AfroBeat Record from the 70’s, it’s been re-issued. And a Phosphorescent album from a while back. And then an album by artist Jenny Hval, who is on Rune Grammofon Label for Norwegian artists. The final album was by The Shoots, a band from the late 70’s. They did an album of their demos, packed full of powerpop. The last live show I went to was a band called Low, at The Sage in Gateshead. It was beautiful! 

Miss Foxy: Amazing! Well thank you so much for talking the time to talk to me, and again well done on your spectacular show this evening. And I wish you all the best for this year! 

(Source: missfoxylearnstoblog)

Evanescence - Narnia - Snow White Queen (by tearzofdadead)

Narnia descends on the common once again. Everything is frosted and bright white. All I need now is turkish delight and the comforting voice of Aslan to make this day complete 

x

I move slow and steady.

Slow and Steady

Of Monsters and Men

x

(Source: youtube.com)

Benoit & Sergio - New Ships (Original Mix) : Miss Foxy reviews the latest tunes by Benoit & Sergio!

missfoxylearnstoblog:

Sweet. My review of Benoit & Sergio’s new material New Ships is up on She Jay. Go check it out

x

Landscape Welcome Part

Joe Gavin

The Lanscape Team [Jin Shimizu you are a bit of a legend]

x

(Source: youtube.com)

Benoit & Sergio - New Ships (Original Mix)
Released Sepember 27th 2012
Having researched into Benoit & Sergio’s own label ‘Visionquest’ I was taken aback at the amount of material this duo have down that has taken the world by storm. Such EP’s as ‘Where The Freaks Have No Name’, in which the single ‘Walk and Talk’ hit the dance world with its catchy soulful beat that I can’t start listening to! I love the lyrics ‘She doesn’t wash her hair, doesn’t wash her clothes and when I come home she doesn’t even say hello’. So I didn’t know what to expect from their latest single ‘New Ships’ released earlier this year in September. Their lyrics are definitely a starting point in many online forums. The single is described as a younger more beautiful version of their current debut. 
So the opening track ‘Lipstick and Lace’ has a steady bassline with vocals that describe unfamiliar places, you can’t help but let the track get under your skin. Its groove reminds me of a souped up version of Horse Meat Disco with such tracks as ‘Fire To Desire’ springing to mind! They’ve thrown in the works with piano chords, major synth hooks and a lotta’ pop madness! ‘Not in your Nature’ follows next, in which we are able to see both grooves and lyrics deepened with vocals floating above a tantalising hypnotic bassline, capturing the moodiness of Fleetwood Mac’s Tango in the Night. 
And finally New Ships hits you like a rolling wave of bass and Rhodes chords, washing across a sunset beach. We are able to hear the distant echo of ‘So many nooses around my neck, as I stare at the sea waiting for the new ships’. Some believe the lyrics to mean ‘the nooses representing the weight of living as they see the infinite possibilities of the future (the sea), waiting for an opportunity’. Me personally? I think it’s the best of Benoit & Sergio we have seen for a while since they released their debut, and I for one cannot wait for future releases. Keep the bass rolling in! 
https://soundcloud.com/benoitandsergio 
https://www.facebook.com/benoitandsergio

Benoit & Sergio - New Ships (Original Mix)

Released Sepember 27th 2012

Having researched into Benoit & Sergio’s own label ‘Visionquest’ I was taken aback at the amount of material this duo have down that has taken the world by storm. Such EP’s as ‘Where The Freaks Have No Name’, in which the single ‘Walk and Talk’ hit the dance world with its catchy soulful beat that I can’t start listening to! I love the lyrics ‘She doesn’t wash her hair, doesn’t wash her clothes and when I come home she doesn’t even say hello’. So I didn’t know what to expect from their latest single ‘New Ships’ released earlier this year in September. Their lyrics are definitely a starting point in many online forums. The single is described as a younger more beautiful version of their current debut.

So the opening track ‘Lipstick and Lace’ has a steady bassline with vocals that describe unfamiliar places, you can’t help but let the track get under your skin. Its groove reminds me of a souped up version of Horse Meat Disco with such tracks as ‘Fire To Desire’ springing to mind! They’ve thrown in the works with piano chords, major synth hooks and a lotta’ pop madness! ‘Not in your Nature’ follows next, in which we are able to see both grooves and lyrics deepened with vocals floating above a tantalising hypnotic bassline, capturing the moodiness of Fleetwood Mac’s Tango in the Night.

And finally New Ships hits you like a rolling wave of bass and Rhodes chords, washing across a sunset beach. We are able to hear the distant echo of ‘So many nooses around my neck, as I stare at the sea waiting for the new ships’. Some believe the lyrics to mean ‘the nooses representing the weight of living as they see the infinite possibilities of the future (the sea), waiting for an opportunity’. Me personally? I think it’s the best of Benoit & Sergio we have seen for a while since they released their debut, and I for one cannot wait for future releases. Keep the bass rolling in! 

https://soundcloud.com/benoitandsergio 

https://www.facebook.com/benoitandsergio

West Coast (feat. Henry Rollins)

Fidlar

Rad. 

x

(Source: youtube.com, via songsthatmakemefeelgood)

So Fidlar’s London show last night was so great even the bouncer felt compelled to stage dive!!
Later this week the band are taking on Manchester and Glasgow and amazing radio are giving you the chance to win tickets! S
http://amazingradio.co.uk/competitions/fidlar
LOVE IT
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Invincible Radio interviews Pete and the Pirates backstage at Nozstock 2010, to find out the details about their upcoming album, and what the band’s plan involves this coming summer….
Miss Foxy: Hey Pirates! So I’ve seen you in and around London performing at various venues. I was wanting to know a few details about your upcoming album, and how you think your music has evolved since you first started playing together?
Pete and the Pirates: We’ve been spending quite a lot of time on it. It’s pretty much done now. We’re going to go to the studio in a week or two to finish it, to get it all done so its really signed, sealed, delivered. How it sounds? It’s difficult to sort of say. Its definitely a progression I suppose, kind of like a natural one though.
Miss Foxy: Who has really influenced the album?
Pete and the Pirates: I think in a lot of ways it was influenced by the material we created before. To do more stuff and make it a bit better. To sort of really try and step it up a little. But I don’t think we’re really influenced by other bands that we’ve heard or anything. We try and ignore that really.
Miss Foxy: Do you have any favourite songs off the album that you would like to plug?
Pete and the Pirates: There is one we’re playing tonight called ‘Can’t Fish’, which is slightly different. It’s weird because all the songs feel natural to us; they are songs we’ve written that we’ve naturally grown into playing. But perhaps it is a bit different from our other songs potentially for the audience. We’ve only played it once before. So its technically a brand new song! Our favourites? Its quite hard to say, because the album is our 15 favourite songs, from the last 60 that we had tried out for the album. I know its a cop out but they are all our favourites!
Miss Foxy: So where did you begin gigging? How did you start out?
Pete and the Pirates: After literally two gigs in Reading where we’re from, we met a small band from London who offered to let us support them. We very quickly then went to London, played a few shows there, moreso then Reading really. Just because its so close to Reading anyway. Me met our label at the Spits [Spittlefield Market], and so were playing within the area quite a bit. Our label did a monthly night there aswell, and we were able to meet various bands who would hang around the Spittlefield venue. You would bump into them reguarly and go on to play sets together. It kind of started from there.
Miss Foxy: Have you got quite a big summer tour plan? Are there any other festivals your playing at?
Pete and the Pirates: We’re not doing that many because of the record. We deliberately didn’t book that many because we knew we would be in the studio a lot. But we’re doing Camp Bestival, and also a show in Romania! Maybe Transylvania as well, its on the cards [laughs]. And a festival on an island, just off the north coast of Holland. We’ve got some odd venues booked up!
Miss Foxy: Really going out there then!
Pete and the Pirates: Yeah we’ve had some really odd offers from Europe. Yeah we’re the band that gets offered the weird gigs! Their really interesting festivals though, really different, big festivals. I think this year we’re doing less of the regular circuit that a lot of bands do. Because we’re doing the record, when you get an offer that stands out like Romania you want to play it. You make an effort, like the one in Holland thats on a little island. You have to get a special boat to get to it, theres no actual transport there persay!
Miss Foxy: Is this your first Nozstock?
Pete and the Pirates: Yeah it is indeed.
Miss Foxy: You enjoying yourselves?
Pete and the Pirates: Unexpectedly nice. We just met someone who claimed this was their 13th Nozstock.
Miss Foxy: Wow! Dedication. So, do you know the ultimate direction for your band? Are you just going to go with the flow?
Pete and the Pirates: Ultimately, we’re just going to do whatever we want! We honestly don’t think about that. It’s not something we sit down and plan. Like Mystery Jets for example may plan a direction to go in. I don’t know if they do but sometimes it seems that way, but we don’t like to plan ‘lets do this’. We’re in quite a good position, we’re very independent. We’re very able to actively do what we want. I think we’ve got goals, like we’d like to get our album out in America, and perhaps tour there. We just want to keep evolving as we have done. We’re pretty happy with how we’ve been progressing.
Miss Foxy: You’ve come a long way.
Pete and the Pirates: Yeah, we obviously want to sell records, become more popular so more people can hear our music. But its not our ultimate goal.
Miss Foxy: Do your fans steer you in the direction of your music, and how its produced?
Pete and the Pirates: No not at all. We always try to think that if we do a record that we’re really happy with, then the hope is that people will like it too. Like if somethings really great, even if you personally don’t like it, then its like ‘oh well we’re really happy with it’ so thats what counts! Theres no point in making something, because people liked the previous material you made, like making something as a response to that, because it will just be a worse version of what you previously did. And you’ll be writing the same song again and again just in a slightly different way. At the end of the day we’re the band, and we have to go out and play, so you better like it! [laughs]
Miss Foxy: Do you guys have a set genre?
Pete and the Pirates: No, I quite like the way I feel that we’re not part of ‘scene’ or ‘genre’. I mean obviously we’re guitar based, rock music but I don’t think we’ve ever felt like we’re part of a specific scene. We just do what we personally are interested in. Which I think so far has worked quite well.
Miss Foxy: Yeah, I think so far your material old and new has been great!
Pete and the Pirates: Maybe we could get a new name for our kind of music [laughs]. Well thats the idea isn’t it, that your so good that your music has a whole new genre of its own [more laughter]. There are other bands that try and be pirate-esque, just stealing other people’s genres! I mean thats a very vain and arrogant thing to think that we’re so original that we have our own genre, thats not it at all. It’s just that I don’t think we’ll ever be part of a particular scene. Our sound is more of a traditional guitar sounding band. You also get bands that sound like something from the past. Like a band will come out and sound a lot like Joy Division or the Rolling Stones. So you always see them as like a ‘rip off’ band, and we don’t wanna be one of those. Even though those bands might be doing well, its a bit of the shadow of the past.
Miss Foxy: Thats great guys! Thanks so much for your time and I look forward to seeing the band soon!

Invincible Radio interviews Pete and the Pirates backstage at Nozstock 2010, to find out the details about their upcoming album, and what the band’s plan involves this coming summer….

Miss Foxy: Hey Pirates! So I’ve seen you in and around London performing at various venues. I was wanting to know a few details about your upcoming album, and how you think your music has evolved since you first started playing together?

Pete and the Pirates: We’ve been spending quite a lot of time on it. It’s pretty much done now. We’re going to go to the studio in a week or two to finish it, to get it all done so its really signed, sealed, delivered. How it sounds? It’s difficult to sort of say. Its definitely a progression I suppose, kind of like a natural one though.

Miss Foxy: Who has really influenced the album?

Pete and the Pirates: I think in a lot of ways it was influenced by the material we created before. To do more stuff and make it a bit better. To sort of really try and step it up a little. But I don’t think we’re really influenced by other bands that we’ve heard or anything. We try and ignore that really.

Miss Foxy: Do you have any favourite songs off the album that you would like to plug?

Pete and the Pirates: There is one we’re playing tonight called ‘Can’t Fish’, which is slightly different. It’s weird because all the songs feel natural to us; they are songs we’ve written that we’ve naturally grown into playing. But perhaps it is a bit different from our other songs potentially for the audience. We’ve only played it once before. So its technically a brand new song! Our favourites? Its quite hard to say, because the album is our 15 favourite songs, from the last 60 that we had tried out for the album. I know its a cop out but they are all our favourites!

Miss Foxy: So where did you begin gigging? How did you start out?

Pete and the Pirates: After literally two gigs in Reading where we’re from, we met a small band from London who offered to let us support them. We very quickly then went to London, played a few shows there, moreso then Reading really. Just because its so close to Reading anyway. Me met our label at the Spits [Spittlefield Market], and so were playing within the area quite a bit. Our label did a monthly night there aswell, and we were able to meet various bands who would hang around the Spittlefield venue. You would bump into them reguarly and go on to play sets together. It kind of started from there.

Miss Foxy: Have you got quite a big summer tour plan? Are there any other festivals your playing at?

Pete and the Pirates: We’re not doing that many because of the record. We deliberately didn’t book that many because we knew we would be in the studio a lot. But we’re doing Camp Bestival, and also a show in Romania! Maybe Transylvania as well, its on the cards [laughs]. And a festival on an island, just off the north coast of Holland. We’ve got some odd venues booked up!

Miss Foxy: Really going out there then!

Pete and the Pirates: Yeah we’ve had some really odd offers from Europe. Yeah we’re the band that gets offered the weird gigs! Their really interesting festivals though, really different, big festivals. I think this year we’re doing less of the regular circuit that a lot of bands do. Because we’re doing the record, when you get an offer that stands out like Romania you want to play it. You make an effort, like the one in Holland thats on a little island. You have to get a special boat to get to it, theres no actual transport there persay!

Miss Foxy: Is this your first Nozstock?

Pete and the Pirates: Yeah it is indeed.

Miss Foxy: You enjoying yourselves?

Pete and the Pirates: Unexpectedly nice. We just met someone who claimed this was their 13th Nozstock.

Miss Foxy: Wow! Dedication. So, do you know the ultimate direction for your band? Are you just going to go with the flow?

Pete and the Pirates: Ultimately, we’re just going to do whatever we want! We honestly don’t think about that. It’s not something we sit down and plan. Like Mystery Jets for example may plan a direction to go in. I don’t know if they do but sometimes it seems that way, but we don’t like to plan ‘lets do this’. We’re in quite a good position, we’re very independent. We’re very able to actively do what we want. I think we’ve got goals, like we’d like to get our album out in America, and perhaps tour there. We just want to keep evolving as we have done. We’re pretty happy with how we’ve been progressing.

Miss Foxy: You’ve come a long way.

Pete and the Pirates: Yeah, we obviously want to sell records, become more popular so more people can hear our music. But its not our ultimate goal.

Miss Foxy: Do your fans steer you in the direction of your music, and how its produced?

Pete and the Pirates: No not at all. We always try to think that if we do a record that we’re really happy with, then the hope is that people will like it too. Like if somethings really great, even if you personally don’t like it, then its like ‘oh well we’re really happy with it’ so thats what counts! Theres no point in making something, because people liked the previous material you made, like making something as a response to that, because it will just be a worse version of what you previously did. And you’ll be writing the same song again and again just in a slightly different way. At the end of the day we’re the band, and we have to go out and play, so you better like it! [laughs]

Miss Foxy: Do you guys have a set genre?

Pete and the Pirates: No, I quite like the way I feel that we’re not part of ‘scene’ or ‘genre’. I mean obviously we’re guitar based, rock music but I don’t think we’ve ever felt like we’re part of a specific scene. We just do what we personally are interested in. Which I think so far has worked quite well.

Miss Foxy: Yeah, I think so far your material old and new has been great!

Pete and the Pirates: Maybe we could get a new name for our kind of music [laughs]. Well thats the idea isn’t it, that your so good that your music has a whole new genre of its own [more laughter]. There are other bands that try and be pirate-esque, just stealing other people’s genres! I mean thats a very vain and arrogant thing to think that we’re so original that we have our own genre, thats not it at all. It’s just that I don’t think we’ll ever be part of a particular scene. Our sound is more of a traditional guitar sounding band. You also get bands that sound like something from the past. Like a band will come out and sound a lot like Joy Division or the Rolling Stones. So you always see them as like a ‘rip off’ band, and we don’t wanna be one of those. Even though those bands might be doing well, its a bit of the shadow of the past.

Miss Foxy: Thats great guys! Thanks so much for your time and I look forward to seeing the band soon!

Hey people!
Ok so Miss Foxy has been busy, what with Nozstock 2010, 2000 Trees coming up AND a variety of interviews with bands from Pete and the Pirates, Gabby Young, King Blues and Sounds of Guns, it seems her talent is never ending [jokes]. But here for you is an interview with Akala, who played the Garden Stage at Nozstock on Saturday, Foxy going behind the scenes to bring to you the downlow on Akala’s music and tour plan this summer…
Miss Foxy: Hey Akala! So we just saw your set, was pretty amazing! How did you feel it went?
Akala: Yeah it was really good, really enjoyed it. Kind of started to build as it went through, got everyone going by the end.
Miss Foxy: Yeah, Shakespeare was an ultimate high for me.
Akala: Aw, I’m glad you enjoyed it.
Miss Foxy: Ok, so since you’ve started out how do you feel your music has evolved?
Akala: I feel its just become more honest. I think a lot broader. Since the first album I’ve probably listened to 500 hundred albums [laughs]. I’ve made a point over the past few years to try and listen to one or two albums I haven’t heard every week, and I’ve done that I wouldn’t say every week in the past 5 years but most weeks. And then when I went travelling for 3 months to South America, I listened to probably 5 albums a week.
Miss Foxy: Oooo where did you go?
Akala: I went to Brazil and Columbia, so because of that I’ve got a much bigger musical reference point then I had when I made the first album. I’ve got a bit more understanding, I’ve learnt to play a bit of guitar, so I’m just learning! I’m a student and I’m at the very beginning. And I think thats quite humbling when you start to try to learn an instrument, that you hadn’t done as a kid, I mean its hard! And it ultimately just lets you know where your at, when you look at people you forget even your Prince’s and your Jimi Hendrix’s who can just play, probably had 4 years of work thats gone into just being in a band in college. It can get pretty humbling. And so I’d say in that way, thats how the music’s changed.
Miss Foxy: Who would you say is an all time influence on your music?
Akala: Jimi Hendrix and Bob Marley. All time two people.
Miss Foxy: Favourite songs?
Akala: Of their’s? I mean I’d be here all day! Of my top 50 songs, I think 15 of them would be Bob Marley. I think his catologue is just riduculous. But I couldn’t pick one.
Miss Foxy: From your material at the moment are there any paricular songs that stand out for you, or hold a special meaning?
Akala: Yeah the new single’s a track called ‘Yours and my Children’ which I played earlier in the set. And then theres ‘Find No Enemy’, they are probably my two favourite songs off the album. I think they are the most direct, the most honest, and I think there the songs on the album that will continue to resonate with people.
Miss Foxy: So far has there been any particular most or least favourite venue that stands out for you?
Akala: I did the first ever hip hop shop in Vietnam. That was pretty good. In Hanoi, and Ho Chi Minh back in 2006.
Miss Foxy: Was it a big crowd?
Akala: Yeah it was 3000 at one and 4000 at the other.
Miss Foxy: Did you play any shows when you were travelling in South America?
Akala: I played one show, in a place called Niteroi, one city away from Rio de Janeiro. That was good.
Miss Foxy: Wow that sounds amazing! So, what are the main themes or topics for most of your songs? Do you think they will change over time?
Akala: I don’t think the topics will change, I think my understanding of them might change, because the topics are the human experience. Love, death, war, poverty, injustice, happiness, where does the universe come from? [laughs] I suppose the philosophical questions will stay the same, but my understanding of them hopefully might evolve.
Miss Foxy: Are there any emerging artists we should look out for? Any you personally feel have the potential to be the next big thing?
Akala: Well it depends what you mean by emerging. There are some artists we’re working with that you probably wouldn’t have heard of. For instance there is a young boy we’re working with, who I wouldn’t say we’re mentoring but he’s 19, he plays 5 to 6 instruments, he’s a really talented producer. I think that now feels like a strange time for music. Where there are two very separate, very distinct entities coming through. You have the commercial music market that is marketed like Coca Cola. And then theres music that people actually like. And I think the only reason people buy commercial music to be honest, is the same way they buy Coco Cola. They buy it because its there, and its everywhere. You drink it, it tastes good, you feel a little sick afterwards, and then you throw it away. And I think that with the world music market, its going so far in the direction of soul-less, drab, uninspiring music. Your getting artists going even more over this way, and in some ways its exciting but it would be nice if bands like Mars Volta were on TV more. Even a band like Radiohead, you think that their last record, as much as it sold because they’ve got a fanbase, in terms of visible presence I’d far sooner see them on my TV or hear them on the radio, but their songs…there a bit weird. Thom Yorke hasn’t got cool enough hair and shoes [laughs] so there not marketable!
Miss Foxy: That reminds me of a conversation I was having yesterday with the King Blues in terms of a more underground sound, and marketing their band through venues that were unheard of, so the only people that attended were those who truly wanted to listen to the bands music.
Akala: Yeah its weird, because for my own shows what I play is intimate gigs because of the presence you create there. I think much more people know about us, but because we’re an independent label we’ve never had that concerted market all at once, where we can do a massive tour and have billboards and posters everywhere. So we’ve done tons and tons of intimate gigs and I love it. But then we’ve also supported Jay Z, Christina Aguilera; I think we’re supporting Nas and Damian Marley next week.
Miss Foxy: Oooo whereabouts? Are you doing the whole tour?
Akala: Yeah, Manchester, London and Birmingham. So its good, but for me I do think that in terms of intimate gigs nothing can beat them. The big gigs are nice though.
Miss Foxy: Yeah the big gigs are nice for thrills, but its harder to get your message across.
Akala: Yeah, I think Brixton Academy is about the limit where it still feels personal. Between 5 to 6000 people and the type of venue it is. I think once you get beyond that and reach to 12, I think you get to a point where it doesn’t feel personal. 5 to 6 feels like the right amount. I mean it could be great if its your actual fans, I’ve only done it for other people’s music so its easy for me to judge.
Miss Foxy: And is this your first Nozstock? How you enjoying it so far?
Akala: First Nozstock yep, really enjoying it. Only been here today [Saturday]. I wish I could stay for the weekend but we’ve got a really early start tomorrow so we’re back to London.
Miss Foxy: Have you got a big tour plan for the summer?
Akala: For November we’ve got a big tour. We’re doing 19 dates, so that should be good!
Miss Foxy: And is there anything else that you could say to bands out there that are trying to make it in the music industry?
Akala: Just do it! Do it all day, every day.

Hey people!

Ok so Miss Foxy has been busy, what with Nozstock 2010, 2000 Trees coming up AND a variety of interviews with bands from Pete and the Pirates, Gabby Young, King Blues and Sounds of Guns, it seems her talent is never ending [jokes]. But here for you is an interview with Akala, who played the Garden Stage at Nozstock on Saturday, Foxy going behind the scenes to bring to you the downlow on Akala’s music and tour plan this summer…

Miss Foxy: Hey Akala! So we just saw your set, was pretty amazing! How did you feel it went?

Akala: Yeah it was really good, really enjoyed it. Kind of started to build as it went through, got everyone going by the end.

Miss Foxy: Yeah, Shakespeare was an ultimate high for me.

Akala: Aw, I’m glad you enjoyed it.

Miss Foxy: Ok, so since you’ve started out how do you feel your music has evolved?

Akala: I feel its just become more honest. I think a lot broader. Since the first album I’ve probably listened to 500 hundred albums [laughs]. I’ve made a point over the past few years to try and listen to one or two albums I haven’t heard every week, and I’ve done that I wouldn’t say every week in the past 5 years but most weeks. And then when I went travelling for 3 months to South America, I listened to probably 5 albums a week.

Miss Foxy: Oooo where did you go?

Akala: I went to Brazil and Columbia, so because of that I’ve got a much bigger musical reference point then I had when I made the first album. I’ve got a bit more understanding, I’ve learnt to play a bit of guitar, so I’m just learning! I’m a student and I’m at the very beginning. And I think thats quite humbling when you start to try to learn an instrument, that you hadn’t done as a kid, I mean its hard! And it ultimately just lets you know where your at, when you look at people you forget even your Prince’s and your Jimi Hendrix’s who can just play, probably had 4 years of work thats gone into just being in a band in college. It can get pretty humbling. And so I’d say in that way, thats how the music’s changed.

Miss Foxy: Who would you say is an all time influence on your music?

Akala: Jimi Hendrix and Bob Marley. All time two people.

Miss Foxy: Favourite songs?

Akala: Of their’s? I mean I’d be here all day! Of my top 50 songs, I think 15 of them would be Bob Marley. I think his catologue is just riduculous. But I couldn’t pick one.

Miss Foxy: From your material at the moment are there any paricular songs that stand out for you, or hold a special meaning?

Akala: Yeah the new single’s a track called ‘Yours and my Children’ which I played earlier in the set. And then theres ‘Find No Enemy’, they are probably my two favourite songs off the album. I think they are the most direct, the most honest, and I think there the songs on the album that will continue to resonate with people.

Miss Foxy: So far has there been any particular most or least favourite venue that stands out for you?

Akala: I did the first ever hip hop shop in Vietnam. That was pretty good. In Hanoi, and Ho Chi Minh back in 2006.

Miss Foxy: Was it a big crowd?

Akala: Yeah it was 3000 at one and 4000 at the other.

Miss Foxy: Did you play any shows when you were travelling in South America?

Akala: I played one show, in a place called Niteroi, one city away from Rio de Janeiro. That was good.

Miss Foxy: Wow that sounds amazing! So, what are the main themes or topics for most of your songs? Do you think they will change over time?

Akala: I don’t think the topics will change, I think my understanding of them might change, because the topics are the human experience. Love, death, war, poverty, injustice, happiness, where does the universe come from? [laughs] I suppose the philosophical questions will stay the same, but my understanding of them hopefully might evolve.

Miss Foxy: Are there any emerging artists we should look out for? Any you personally feel have the potential to be the next big thing?

Akala: Well it depends what you mean by emerging. There are some artists we’re working with that you probably wouldn’t have heard of. For instance there is a young boy we’re working with, who I wouldn’t say we’re mentoring but he’s 19, he plays 5 to 6 instruments, he’s a really talented producer. I think that now feels like a strange time for music. Where there are two very separate, very distinct entities coming through. You have the commercial music market that is marketed like Coca Cola. And then theres music that people actually like. And I think the only reason people buy commercial music to be honest, is the same way they buy Coco Cola. They buy it because its there, and its everywhere. You drink it, it tastes good, you feel a little sick afterwards, and then you throw it away. And I think that with the world music market, its going so far in the direction of soul-less, drab, uninspiring music. Your getting artists going even more over this way, and in some ways its exciting but it would be nice if bands like Mars Volta were on TV more. Even a band like Radiohead, you think that their last record, as much as it sold because they’ve got a fanbase, in terms of visible presence I’d far sooner see them on my TV or hear them on the radio, but their songs…there a bit weird. Thom Yorke hasn’t got cool enough hair and shoes [laughs] so there not marketable!

Miss Foxy: That reminds me of a conversation I was having yesterday with the King Blues in terms of a more underground sound, and marketing their band through venues that were unheard of, so the only people that attended were those who truly wanted to listen to the bands music.

Akala: Yeah its weird, because for my own shows what I play is intimate gigs because of the presence you create there. I think much more people know about us, but because we’re an independent label we’ve never had that concerted market all at once, where we can do a massive tour and have billboards and posters everywhere. So we’ve done tons and tons of intimate gigs and I love it. But then we’ve also supported Jay Z, Christina Aguilera; I think we’re supporting Nas and Damian Marley next week.

Miss Foxy: Oooo whereabouts? Are you doing the whole tour?

Akala: Yeah, Manchester, London and Birmingham. So its good, but for me I do think that in terms of intimate gigs nothing can beat them. The big gigs are nice though.

Miss Foxy: Yeah the big gigs are nice for thrills, but its harder to get your message across.

Akala: Yeah, I think Brixton Academy is about the limit where it still feels personal. Between 5 to 6000 people and the type of venue it is. I think once you get beyond that and reach to 12, I think you get to a point where it doesn’t feel personal. 5 to 6 feels like the right amount. I mean it could be great if its your actual fans, I’ve only done it for other people’s music so its easy for me to judge.

Miss Foxy: And is this your first Nozstock? How you enjoying it so far?

Akala: First Nozstock yep, really enjoying it. Only been here today [Saturday]. I wish I could stay for the weekend but we’ve got a really early start tomorrow so we’re back to London.

Miss Foxy: Have you got a big tour plan for the summer?

Akala: For November we’ve got a big tour. We’re doing 19 dates, so that should be good!

Miss Foxy: And is there anything else that you could say to bands out there that are trying to make it in the music industry?

Akala: Just do it! Do it all day, every day.